Oily Skin – 7 Restoratives for a Happy Face

If you’ve got to blame someone for that oily skin, blame it to your genes!Chances are they came from someplace where oily skin served a useful purpose, such as combating the effects of excessive Mediterranean sunlight or monson rains. Heredity does play a big part in oily skin, but so do hormones. Stress can also cause the oil glands to kick into overdrive. The wrong cosmetics can easily aggravate an otherwise mild case of oily skin.

There is no magic cure for oily skin. The most recommended and practical tip anyone can get from experts is to keep the skin clean, all the time. Here are some practical skin care tips though that may help combat the skin oiliness.

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Make Mine Mud

Masks can cleanse the skin of surface greasiness, but don’t expect them to “deep-clean” the pores (the term is meaningless, some experts say) or do anything more than temporarily tone the skin.

Clay masks or mud masks are worthwhile, though masks will make the skin feel good and look better, it’s only temporary. Generally, the darker brown the clay (mud), the more oil it can absorb. White or rose-colored clays, though, are gentler and work best on sensitive skin.

Splash on the hot suds
Hot water is a good solvent. Wash oily skin with warm water and with plenty of soap. This will dissolve skin oil better than cold water and soap because more things dissolve in hot than cold, and that includes soap and the grit and grime you’re trying to get rid of on your skin.

Seek out drying soaps
Given the state of the art in oily skin treatment, all you can really do is degrease the skin and that has to be done repeatedly with astringents and with drying soaps.

Finding a drying soap is not a problem (finding one that won’t dry the skin can be, however). Many dermatologist seem to favor good old Ivory for oily skin, alongwith more specialized degreasing soaps such as Cuticura Mildly Medicated Soap, Clerasil soap and Neutrogena Oily Skin Formula, to name a few.

Follow with astringents

Astringents with acetone are your best bet, according to some dermatologists. Acetone is a great fat, and grease solvent and most astringents have a bit acetone in them. If you use it regularly, you can surely remove oil from the skin. Although most astringents contain alcohol, look for a brand that also contains acetones, such as Seba-Nil. Ordinary rubbing alcohol, however, can be used as an effective inexpensive astringent. Those looking for something milder can try witch hazel, which contains some alcohol and also works well.

Nonalcohol astringents contain mostly water and are not as effective as those with alcohol and acetone, but they may be of help for those with sensitive skin. Worth noting: Dermatologists says that rather than washing the face several times a day which can leave it too dry and irritated, you’re better off to carry astringent pads with you and use them to cleanse the face.

Select Cosmetics with Care

Cosmetics come in two categories, the oil-based and the water-based. If you’ve got oily skin, use only a water based product.

There are many cosmetics formulated for oily skin. They are made to soaks up and cover oiliness so the skin doesn’t look as greasy. But no cosmetic has any magical ingredient that will slow down or stop oil production, so don’t be lured into buying products that make such claims.

Take a Powder
Baby powder, that is. For additional shine-free protection, some women find that simple products such as Johnsons Baby Powder(yes, that powder you use to bring in your High School and Elementary days!) make a superb face powder when fluffed over makeup.

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3 Comments

  1. My face is very oily too 🙁 Thank you for the wonderful tips. I have to make sure that I use mild soap and facial cleanser. I never try the mask yet 🙂

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